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The Lennon Harper Designs Process

The Lennon Harper Designs Process

 

When I begin to work with a new or existing client on a custom design, we start with a few standard questions:

 

    • Is there a color scheme/palette in mind? Specific design or style? Monochromatic? Wild and Colorful?
    • Do you love bling and sparkle or prefer a more subtle design?
    • Most importantly- do you have a special piece you want to incorporate or do I have license to source/create?

 

It’s likely we will go back and forth with images and design ideas a few times once I begin playing around with the design because the most important thing to me is capturing the essence of what you are looking for.

 

When we’re on the same page with the final product, I put it all together, package it up beautifully and send it off.

 

 

Every family is made up of personal, unique stories, memories, tragedies, and people that make us who we are. I love that through my work, I can bring memories and loved ones closer together. Here are a few pieces I’ve made recently and their stories.

 

 

“A Mother and Child Reunion”

 

This is Fran Richardson. She was a mother, grandmother, wife, friend, sister, and SO many other things. Although I never had the privilege of meeting her, I know all of these things meant the world to her daughter Kathleen, and her friends and family. Before she passed, my client and friend, Kathleen, put aside a few of her fancy vintage clip-on earrings and a cameo pin she used to wear. We worked together and ended up creating these pieces that she and her daughters share. What an honor!! She was able to show her mom the final creations before her passing, and will cherish them as a lasting and priceless sweet memory of her mom. I’m so grateful to have worked with Kathleen.

 

Fran Richardson, Longview, TX

 

Kathleen Mullins (wearing an LHD custom design) with her three children Ryan, Caitlin, and Erin

 

 

My Great-grandma Ruby’s Watch Face

 

While on our spring break beach vacation this year, my mom shared with me the story of her grandma Ruby and one of her most vivid memories, as a very young girl, of sitting with her winding her watch.

 

Ruby grew up in a small Iowa town where her father ran a barber shop out of the main hotel in the downtown area. At about 18, Ruby and the son of the hotel owner became pregnant. This was not something that happened in 1910 without marriage coming first and was met with great disapproval. The families both pushed for quick nuptials, but Ruby did not love the boy and refused. Instead, she had the baby and left shortly thereafter for the big city of Omaha (it’s all relative after all). She had enough money saved to rent a small apartment in the downtown area.

 

Durham Museum Soda Fountain and Candy Counter

The soda fountain at Durham Western Heritage Museum.

 

Eventually she made her living by running a small gift shop inside the Union Station Omaha train station where she sold cards, sodas, and little gifts to families and loved ones reuniting or saying goodbye.

 

(Years later, I would marry my husband, Kevin, inside this incredibly gorgeous art deco train station remade into the Durham Western Heritage Museum)

 

Ruby never had any more children but she loved spending time with her granddaughters, Patty and Pam. My mom, Pam (Pammy Jo), tells me she remembers the smell of the incense Ruby would burn in a small brass Buddha on the old fashioned porcelain stove/ice box combo.(I love vintage appliances and have a 6-burner Roper from the 60’s-but that’s another story) They would sit and snuggle together, and Pammy Jo would wind her grandma Ruby’s little dainty watch seen here in the center of this very special and sentimental piece of one-of-a-kind jewelry.

 

 

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